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Archive for the ‘Weekend Breakfast Series’ Category

A few weeks ago, I went to the sugarshack at Hanging Mountain Farm, and one of the many, many food items on my plate was baked oatmeal. It was delicious, so I tried to recreate it, and I succeeded, more or less. It’s really simple, so this isn’t exactly a recipe so much as a “didja know?”.

You may be thinking, “why would a person want to bake oatmeal?” Well, I’ll tell you. While oatmeal can be a delicious and filling breakfast, it does have a certain… mucousy quality, for lack of a better word. The baking removes that and improves the texture, and makes oatmeal palatable to people who normally can’t stand it. 

So, you start by making oatmeal the regular way. You know, you use regular, plain rolled oats (not the instant kind! There’s no improving on those. Blech.) and cook with a water-to-oat ratio of 2:1 over low heat until the water is absorbed. I added a handful of raisins and chopped-up dried apples, although I imagine any other kind of dried fruit would be equally delicious. When the oatmeal is cooked, dump it into an oven-safe bowl, add a pat of butter, a glug of maple syrup (or a spoonful of brown sugar), a dash of cinnamon, and a sprinkle of salt. I think chopped walnuts would be good too, although I haven’t tried. Or almonds?

Stir it all up, pop it in a 350 degree oven, and bake for 20 minutes or until the texture looks good to you, stirring regularly.

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Granola is so ridiculously easy to make that you don’t even need a recipe. That said, here’s a recipe for it. The special thing about this recipe is that it’s essentially held together by  maple caramel. Oh, that *does* sound good, doesn’t it!?

In a little pan, melt 2 tbs butter and add 1/3 C real maple syrup. Cook this over low heat for five minutes or so. It’ll boil and go nuts and get really foamy and way thicker.

In a bowl, combine 2 cups of oats, 1 cup of crushed walnuts (I put them in a bag and then roll a rolling pin over them), 2 tbs flax seeds, 1/4 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp cinnamon. Then add the caramel mixture and stir until the dry stuff is evenly moistened. Use your hands if need be.

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I made these a really long time ago, but I’m only just getting around to posting the recipe now. Buckwheat is supposed to be really good for you, it’s gluten free or something. I don’t know. I tried them because Upingill Farm sells their own buckwheat flour, so I had to buy some, and what do you do with buckwheat flour? Pancakes. Everything in this recipe can be procured locally, except the baking powder and the salt.

1C buckwheat flour
1 tsp baking powder
2 tbs sugar (I used honey, because I can get that locally)
pinch of salt
1 egg, beaten
1 cup milk
2tbs melted butter.

 Mix dry ingredients, mix wet ingredients, combine gently, and cook in a skillet. Just like every other pancake.

These are pretty hardcore as far as pancakes go. I might substitute a quarter of the cup of buckwheat with wheat flour. But I thought this was a tasty and unusual (and therefore fun) breakfast treat. I cooked up some apples with cinnamon and a little maple syrup to put on top, and I would recommend doing that as well.

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This is a very special edition of the weekend breakfast series, since I managed to get my hands on some very special ingredients. Goose eggs! I got them from Winterberry Farm in Leverett when I was up there for their annual shearing party. This is what they looked like all nestled up together at the farm. Of course I had to get some, right?

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This is a picture of the eggs next to a chicken egg for scale. Doesn’t the regular egg look ridiculously small?The goose eggs look positively majestic next to it! Yes, they were beautiful.

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Here’s what they looked like once I broke them. I know, it’s a tiny bit ridiculous to document the journey of the goose eggs this closely. But one of them had two yolks! Twins.  Also, you can’t really tell in the pictures, but those yolks are huge. Huge!

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I sauteed some mushrooms and onions, grated in some cheddar cheese, and chopped up some basil for the fritatta. In the end, it was tasty, but I couldn’t really taste the difference between these and regular eggs. Jill from Winterberry Farm said that goose eggs have more “loft.” So… I guess this frittata was more lofty than a regular fritatta? I couldn’t say. But it was definitely fun to crack those huge eggs, and beat those enormous yolks, and say things like “I can’t believe this is only two eggs!” while we were eating.

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My mom used to make this apple pancake as a very special weekend breakfast treat. We only had it once in a blue moon, so the deliciousness was enhanced by its rarity. It’s eggy and sweet and the edges are all crispy and buttery, and it’s beautiful. Yum! Also, where I live, the orchards all still have apples in cold storage, so you can still get locally-grown fruit for it. Here’s the recipe:

2 apples
1tsp lemon juice
2 tbs brown sugar
1/2 tsp cinnamon
3 eggs
1/2 c plus 2 tbs flour
1/2 c plus 2 tbs milk
1/4 c sugar
2 tbs butter

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